Catching and Keeping Frogs

Many young boys spend much of their summer vacations camping out and trudging through swamps in the search for these cute little critters. But few know how to actually care for their new pet once they get one.

Catching

For me, catching frogs was much easier when I was younger than it is now. I didn’t even need a net back then. For those of us who are no longer as nimble and stealthy as we once were, I recommend getting a butterfly-net with a long handle. The standard fish nets don’t work very well as frogs are almost supernatural in their ability to slip through the gaps. Find any lake, pond, or even a river and slowly move around it, keeping yourself as low as you can. Frogs are very jumpy creatures, pardon for the pun, and they will leap into the water at the sight of you.

The best way to do this is to spot the frog from a distance, then sneak up on it from its blind-spot, get as close as you can, and then pounce with the net. This may take a few tries, but don’t get discouraged; practice makes perfect, and there is something to be said for dumb luck. Once you do catch a frog, place it in a jar with about an inch of water; you MUST keep it moist or it will die.

Housing

Now most people just stick pet frogs in an aquarium filled with water. DON’T DO THIS! Frogs only use water to escape from predators and mating, they don’t actually live in it. At most, your tank should only be half filled with water using a piece of Plexiglas and sealer to divide it. Fill it to the top of this divider with water on one side and dirt on the other. I also recommend putting a small ramp of some sort into the water leading to the Plexiglas divider to make it easier for your frog to get out when it wants to.

Whatever you do DON’T USE TAP WATER! Most tap water has chlorine in it, and amphibians absorb this through their skin. That’s why everyone looks at amphibians for signs of pollution; they are more sensitive to such things. Now there are several ways around this problem. You can collect water for a nearby pond or other natural water source, or you can collect rain. If there is no nearby water source, and rain is too unreliable, you can use a dehumidifier and collect the water from that. I use this method since it ensures that I always have a ready supply.

Finally, if you don’t have a dehumidifier, you can just boil some tap water to get rid of the chlorine, but I try to avoid this as it might not always be effective. The soil filling the other half of your tank should be taken from outside in your yard as store bought soil can contain pesticides which are harmful to frogs. If your water is more than three inches deep, I recommend some kind of filter or fountain so the water does not become stagnant.

You may also want to put a small shelter in the tank, though this is not really necessary as your frog will probably spend most of it’s time on the ramp or at the water’s edge, ready to jump to safety at the first sign of danger, though it will get used to your presence over time. You will also need a cover as frogs are VERY good jumpers.

Feeding

Frogs, especially small ones, don’t eat as much as their gluttonous cousins the toads, but they can still have healthy appetites, and you should feed them as much as they can eat. in the wild, frogs mostly eat the large flies that you see darting around the shoreline, but these are very hard to keep in a terrarium, so you will have to substitute crickets and any arthropods you can find outside in your yard.

Simply drop them in front of your frog (you’ll be surprised how fast he can snap them up) your frog may jump into the water at the sight of you at first. If this happens, just wait until it surfaces and then slowly drop the bugs in front of it. It will get used to you eventually. If your frog eats a bug but then spits it back up, it means that he is full, so you can just dump in the rest of the bugs.

Your frog will eat them at his leisure. As with toads, a skinny frog is a sickly frog, feed him frequently and make sure there are always bugs in the tank for him to eat when he wants to. Large frogs may also eat small ones, if they are hungry enough, so keep this in mind if you have more than one.

Other Considerations

When you get a frog, try not to get a very large one. I know it’s human instinct to think that large pets are better, but a large frog is an old frog, and it won’t live as long. Catching a smaller, younger one will allow you to enjoy it for longer. I don’t recommend trying to pick up and hold your frog; they are slippery little things and can easily jump out of your hands. They are much harder to recapture than a toad is as they are faster and better jumpers.

Like toads, frogs lay their eggs in water and the tadpoles may be hard to care for, so I don’t recommend trying to breed them, especially since mature frogs will croak throughout the night and this may drive you insane. (though I find it relaxing myself.) do NOT keep frogs with turtles. TURTLES EAT FROGS! But you can keep them with fish if you have the proper set up.

Finally, frogs hibernate in the winter by burying themselves in the mud, but if the room they are in is warm, they won’t need to do this.

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  1. kay

    On March 29, 2008 at 2:47 pm

    this is totaly useful because me and my friend keep trying to catch frogs(and crawdads!)-but they keep dying-not to mention the snakes are coming out!
    thankx for the info(I’m sure the’ll live longer now!)-i’ll vist reguarly!

  2. terri

    On May 22, 2008 at 12:59 pm

    my frogs tongue is hanging out this morning, is this a sign that he is dying? dehydrated? Please help

  3. Togot

    On May 22, 2008 at 5:08 pm

    Terri i have honestly never encountered that with a living frog before. my advice would be to make sure he has water and food in case it is from dehydration. good luck, and let me know what happens

  4. emily

    On July 7, 2008 at 6:54 pm

    what happens if your frog dosent eat???

  5. Togot

    On July 8, 2008 at 3:31 am

    Emily, There are several reasons why a frog or toad won’t eat: they don’t like the kind of food you are giving them for various reasons such as the insect is too large/small, or toxic or is aggressive (my frogs won’t touch the beetles with large mandibles because they bite their tongues) it could also be that your pet is shy and won’t eat in front of you or if you are around. My smaller leopard frogs won’t move a muscle if I am in the same room with them. I have to give them their crickets and then leave. The only other reason I could think of is that your pet is sick and should be taken to a vet.

  6. frogger

    On July 13, 2008 at 5:18 pm

    i just cauthg this new frog and it won’t eat should i try to force feed it

  7. frogger

    On July 13, 2008 at 5:26 pm

    my frog melon,has bare skin on his nose it is white and I don’t know what to do?

  8. Togot

    On July 14, 2008 at 11:44 am

    Frogger, force feeding a frog isn’t a good idea. it seems a lot of people are having this problem and the main reason is probably that the frog is afraid and doesn’t want to move much with you there. give it time to get used to it’s new home, and leave the room when you put in food. as for the nose, it probably hurt its nose jumping into something; it shouldn’t be anything you need to worry about.

  9. frogger

    On July 14, 2008 at 4:48 pm

    should I KEEP A TREE FROG OVER WINTER,OR TOADS

  10. Togot

    On July 15, 2008 at 2:57 am

    Frogger, tree frogs require a slightly different setup than regular frogs. i will write a care sheet just for them, so keep your eyes open. as for keeping them over winter, as long as you keep them inside your house, then there should be no change in their behavior. if you are keeping them outside, you just provide them with at least a foot of dirt to dig in and hibernate.

  11. frogger

    On July 15, 2008 at 5:01 pm

    just to let u no one of my leapord frogs died,he was already acting wierd. also i’m a girl!

  12. Togot

    On July 15, 2008 at 7:01 pm

    Frogger, I’m sorry to hear that. my leopard frogs are doing well, so is my bullfrog. I have to feed them separate because the leopards are afraid of the larger bullfrog and won‘t go for food with him around. he isn’t big enough to eat them, but he has accidental bitten their limbs when a beetle was crawling on them. i hope you have better luck in the future.

  13. noush

    On July 16, 2008 at 3:02 pm

    can frogs jump out of deep water, i have this bin outside to collect rain water and i have noticed that their is a load of tagpoles in it i just wanted to know if the frog would be still in the bin with them as their is a new batch just appeared

  14. frogger

    On July 16, 2008 at 6:51 pm

    my other leapord frog and my bullfrog don’t mind each other

  15. Togot

    On July 17, 2008 at 2:35 am

    Noush, in my experience a frog has to be able to put its hind legs against a solid surface in order to jump. it could be that the water level was lower when the eggs were laid. in any event, i recommend you read my article on caring for tadpoles so you can turn all of those little guys into jumping adults. good luck.

    Frogger, my leapord frogs are considerably smaller than the bullfrog. not small enough to be eaten, but small enough for them to not want to push their luck.

  16. momofnatureboy

    On July 20, 2008 at 10:05 pm

    Hey Togot, my son caught a small frog a few days ago and is now keeping it as his pet. With him, catching bugs is second nature and he has caught small crickets, lightning bugs, roley poley’s and flies since. The frog, named Wheeley after “pop-a-wheeley”, hasn’t ate at all and pretty much just sits there. I am concerned, partially because I don’t know too much about frogs, and was wondering if anything was wrong? Wheeley is about an inch long and is brown with darker brown spots, do you know what kind of frog it is? We set up a home for it and it is half water, and half a medium size resting rock, does that sound appropriate? Please write with any advice, and I’d really like to know what kind of frog he??? is!!!

    ~MomofNatureboy

  17. Kim

    On July 21, 2008 at 11:48 am

    My friend has a pond in her backyard and I know where there are a bunch of little bright green frogs (NJ woods). She would like me to catch one or two to bring to her pond, but I don’t want to hurt the little guys or cause them to die. Will this work? Her pond has pond fish in it and lots of plants and rocks. To me it looks like heaven, but will the frog stay there? Thanks.

  18. Togot

    On July 21, 2008 at 12:33 pm

    momofnatureboy, a lot of people seem to be having this problem and I find it puzzling myself. every frog i have ever had has been a glutton that ate anything that crossed it’s path. the only reasons i can think of for frogs not to eat is that they are not comfortable with their surroundings, too cold, the food is too large, or they are sick. it is also possible that your frog is eating, just not while you are there. a way to find out is to place one or two insects with your pet, leave for awhile and come back to see if the same number of insects is still in the tank. if you are sure he is not eating, the most likely cause is illness. you can take your pet to an exotic vet, or wait and hope the illness passes. either way, the apatite will return when its health does. as for what species, i can’t be sure based on that description alone, but it sounds like it might be a leopard frog. i hope this was helpful.

    Kim, as long as you don’t have chlorine or any other chemicals in the water, it should be fine. if you want your frogs to stay, i recommend adding duckweed. frogs love using it for cover. to convince them that it is a good home, you should put them directly into the water, rather than on the land.

  19. Kim

    On July 21, 2008 at 12:56 pm

    Thank you Togot – we will give it a try.

  20. frogger

    On July 26, 2008 at 6:26 pm

    togot, I have a big leapord frog and then an other small frog that is small enough that my other frog can eat it will my leapord frog eat it??

  21. Togot

    On July 26, 2008 at 10:31 pm

    Frogger, YES, a larger frog will eat a smaller one if it can. I have had this happen and it is very disturbing to see your big frog with little frog feet sticking out of his mouth…especially if they are still twitching. i recommend you separate them.

  22. frogger

    On July 27, 2008 at 9:09 am

    togot thank you

  23. gorgge

    On July 30, 2008 at 2:51 pm

    i love my frog that i found but what do i feed it

  24. Togot

    On July 31, 2008 at 2:25 am

    Gorgge, feed it insects, crickets, ants, woodlice, beetles. just about anything small enough for it to eat should do

  25. Randomperson

    On August 6, 2008 at 2:39 pm

    i have 5 tad poles and 1 has all 4 legs what do i feed them

  26. millie

    On August 6, 2008 at 5:05 pm

    I got this frog tank and it says in the directions to use tap water is that ok.

  27. Togot

    On August 7, 2008 at 2:14 am

    Randomperson, you can feed your tadpoles fish flakes for goldfish, as for the one with legs, if it’s coming out of the water you can feed it any insect smaller than its head.

    millie, you can use tap water, but you should let it sit for about 24 hours to allow the chemicals to dissipate before putting your amphibian friend into it or he can die.

  28. Randomperson

    On August 10, 2008 at 8:08 am

    Togot, do you have any articles on Red-eared Slider Turtles. I really like your information, but if you dont have any articles on Red-eared Slider Turtles then im sure i can find a good web site.

    Im always getting new pets and so far i have 5 tadpoles 1 frog 1 toad 1 dog 2 cats 1 rabbit and 1 turtle. My mom doest mind if I bring home the animals that I find just as long as I keep the ones she doesnt like outside and it the winter I can use the cellar.

  29. Togot

    On August 10, 2008 at 12:57 pm

    Randomperson, i do have an article on the care of painted turtles which have the same requirements as red eared sliders. i too have many pets. i have at one time or another cared for every pet on which i have written an article. nothing beats experience.

  30. jake

    On August 10, 2008 at 11:14 pm

    i have frogsbut i dont know what ind they are they are greenish-brown and have black spots ad they have white stomachs

  31. jake

    On August 10, 2008 at 11:15 pm

    should i put grass in the water for my frogs

  32. Togot

    On August 11, 2008 at 2:01 pm

    Jake, it sounds like you have a common green frog. they can be found in most ponds and rivers. and no, you should not put grass in the water, it will only die and rot and you will have to clean the water out. you can put grass seeds in the substrat if you have dirt or mud, but you will need to provide direct sunlight for it to grow.

  33. momof2

    On August 29, 2008 at 7:06 pm

    I have a 3 leopard frogs. Two in one cage, one in the second cage. The terrarium that has the two frogs, both started at the same size. Though now one is 1 1/2 times the other one. Plus, the larger one has fairly skinny legs and large body. It doesn’t hop as much as scoots. What solution do you have to build up the legs without building up the from

  34. Togot

    On August 29, 2008 at 10:40 pm

    momof2, it’s possible that the larger frog eats more than the smaller one, or that it is the opposite sex. in most frog species one gender is larger than the other. as for building up muscles, try to encourage activity. make sure they have deep enough water to swim in and make sure they have live food that they have to jump after to catch.

  35. heidi jordan

    On September 1, 2008 at 9:17 pm

    omg….this totally helps…i really needed this…but can they eat any kind of bugs…like spiders…and beatles??
    and another thing how do you know what type of frog you have??
    and can you keep frogs and toads in the same cage??

  36. Togot

    On September 2, 2008 at 11:38 am

    heidi jordan, yes frogs and toads can eat most varieties of nonpoisonous insects and arachnids. there are several websites that list pictures of different species according to state, and although you technically can keep a frog and toad in the same cage, they prefer different habitats so it is difficult. toads prefer the dirt, frogs like water.

  37. Nadia

    On September 6, 2008 at 8:31 pm

    My frog just sits at the side of the tank, and hops constantly, why is he doing this? is it a bad thing?

  38. Togot

    On September 7, 2008 at 11:41 pm

    Nadia, it could be something as simple as him trying to get out of the tank. frogs don’t understand the concept of glass and will try to jump through it. try putting something on the side that he is staying to discourage this.

  39. frog lover

    On October 9, 2008 at 9:06 pm

    I had just got one tiny frog,i love it soo much.But it is not realy eating a lot. I this normal??

  40. Togot

    On October 10, 2008 at 2:47 am

    Frog lover, since you say it’s a small frog, then as long as its eating anything it should be fine. feed it ants, pillbugs, and the like.

  41. Alyssa

    On March 2, 2009 at 8:58 pm

    I have had 4…no 5 frogs and only one has died it was a firebelly i got at petsmart also do you have any idea how to tell if a firebelly is a girl or boy I’ve heard and seen them breed befor but no tadpoles!Also what month do frogs lay their eggs

  42. Togot

    On March 3, 2009 at 2:35 pm

    Although I have never kept fire bellies myself, I did some research for you and learned that the males grow little pads on their fingers to help them grip the females during mating which occurs during early summer. Though I don‘t know the exact month, paying eggs takes place in mid to late summer.

  43. zzgeorgezz

    On March 20, 2009 at 11:43 am

    hi there..i have just bought some frog spawn home for the kids to watch grow…i have got a cheap tank from pet shop…but have now now decided this is to good for river water as im concerned it may block the filter with all the bugs and stuff…can u give me some advice on what fish i can put in there as i may put some tag poles in the tank after they have matured abit…i have put some stuff in there to take chlorine out and have some stuff to put in with ‘good’ bacteria….if i give the kids say some cheap 15 litre aquariums how many tagpoles will live in there….how will i keep water oxygenated…if i just lift a jug out of the water each day and pour it back in say 5 times a day will that sufice…is it ok to just feed them fishflakes as i read earlier on this page….all help advice much appreciated….thanks

  44. zzgeorgezz

    On March 20, 2009 at 2:50 pm

    hi there..i have just bought some frog spawn home for the kids to watch grow…i have got a cheap tank from pet shop…but have now decided this is to good for river water as im concerned it may block the filter with all the bugs and stuff…can u give me some advice on what fish i can put in there as i may put some tag poles in the tank after they have matured abit…i have put some stuff in there to take chlorine out and have some stuff to put in with \’good\’ bacteria….if i give the kids say some cheap 15 litre aquariums how many tagpoles will live in there….how will i keep water oxygenated…if i just lift a jug out of the water each day and pour it back in say 5 times a day will that sufice…is it ok to just feed them fishflakes as i read earlier on this page….all help advice much appreciated….thanks….you can email me on zzgjhzz@hotmail.co.uk ….thanks….

  45. Togot

    On March 21, 2009 at 2:05 pm

    Zzgeorgezz, most non-carnivorous fish should get along with tadpoles. Goldfish, plecostomus, and other community fish. Don’t put a crawdad in with them because it will eat them. Mixing water like that might work, but it’s best to have an oxygenating air pump that you can get at a pet store, especially if you are keeping more than one tadpole in it. Tadpoles will eat almost anything you put in with them, even tiny bits of lunchmeat. The smarter ones will even come to the surface and swim upside-down to eat the fish flakes.

  46. zzgeorgezz

    On March 21, 2009 at 4:36 pm

    ok thanks togot…thats great…once the tagpoles have “hatched”in the container with river water in…how long do you think it will be before i can put them in the other tank….and if the other tank is clean dechlorinated and supporting fish…will the tagpoles be ok to be transfered to there….i got the frog spawn out of a non flowing brook…it is a storm over flow so was destined to dry up soon anyway…i put the spawn in a jar with some weed and water…i have got some river water in a large container and was going to let them hatch in that then put them in the tank which has got an oxygenating filter…do you think that will be ok and then i can let the rest go in the moat round the village…also i saw in the shop the other day some oxygenating tablets would these do as they are alot cheaper than another pump…wot do you reckon…thanks…

  47. Togot

    On March 21, 2009 at 10:13 pm

    Once both the jar and the tank are at room temperature you should be able to transfer the eggs in, but only if there aren’t already fish in the tank. The fish might eat the spawn. Your setup sounds like it would be fine, just make sure to have a dock for when they turn into frogs and need to get out of the water occasionally. You don‘t need a heat lamp for frogs so you don‘t need to worry about that. I’m afraid I don’t know much about the oxygenating pellets as I have never used them before. If they will save money than give them a try with a comet goldfish and see how it works out.

  48. zzgeorgezz

    On March 23, 2009 at 3:08 pm

    ok thanks togot….

  49. Jim

    On April 2, 2009 at 12:40 am

    Hello I read your article and I found it very intersetsing.
    I have a quick question. Are there ANY poisinous frogs in California? To be exact Lytle Creek California?
    Thank you!

  50. Togot

    On April 2, 2009 at 4:24 am

    Jim, not to my knowledge

  51. Jim

    On April 2, 2009 at 4:21 pm

    Ok thank you. Have a great day.:-)

  52. devs mommy

    On July 7, 2009 at 10:06 am

    i have @ very tiny frogs and one that is 4-5 times larger that just transformed.the larger one still has half of his tail.it has not changed in 2 days.the smaller oneslost there tails in less than a day.he is breather and hopping and eating flightless fruitflies.will it stay like this or eventually fully absorb?is it some kind of birth defect?he was found as a tadpole in a spring run-off in western massachusetts.we get our water from that spring.just want to make sure its not something in the water.

  53. Togot

    On July 8, 2009 at 2:21 am

    devs mommy, his tail should absorb into his body over time. frogs, like people, develop at different speeds. in many cases deformities in frogs are actually caused by a parasite which causes the growth of extra limbs.

  54. christie

    On May 1, 2010 at 4:17 am

    i have no pond and its winter but how do i fined a frog

  55. Togot

    On May 3, 2010 at 4:05 am

    Christie, during the winter, frogs and toads burry themselves and hibernate. It would be difficult to find them, and unwise to dig them up. My advice is to wait until spring, or buy one from a pet store.

  56. Skillet

    On May 23, 2010 at 11:28 pm

    I just found these really tiny frogs in our barn. I think I’ll try to keep one as a pet. Can you suggest things for frogs so small? They’re no bigger than the tip of your finger. Really small. Also, I’m pretty sure they’re all the same type. Would you suggest that I keep two instead of one? Most animals are better off with another to keep them company, but I don’t know if this is true with frogs.

  57. Skillet

    On May 23, 2010 at 11:31 pm

    ^things as in what they should eat. They can’t take much being so small.

  58. Togot

    On May 24, 2010 at 1:50 am

    Skillet, Although frogs can be kept together they are a tad territorial, and if one gets much bigger than the other he will eat him. As for what to feed them, try ants and pill bugs. You can also buy small crickets from a pet store

  59. lilly

    On June 5, 2010 at 12:31 pm

    i want to keep my frog out side but were do i but it and i dont want it in a aqarium or contaner or a jar please help me

  60. Togot

    On June 7, 2010 at 3:52 pm

    Lilly, I’m afraid your only other option would be to make a pond in your backyard and try to devise some kind of fence around it. This seems like an unrealistic project, though some people do make ponds to encourage frogs and other wildlife to live on their property without being contained.

  61. Jeff

    On September 4, 2010 at 8:43 pm

    Emily try buying a pair of plastic twesers form a pet store and pet their food on that and it will work i had the same problem

  62. maddog1213

    On September 20, 2010 at 4:14 pm

    ok so i have a toad that i caught and i bought him blood worms and hes not eating is that cuz he doesnt like it . also can i keep him over the winter and let him go when spring comes or is that to dangerous?????

  63. maddog1213

    On September 20, 2010 at 4:19 pm

    also if can keep him over the winter should i give him a dirt moun even though hes in my room ??? ok and i have 2 dogs is that ok

  64. maddog1213

    On September 20, 2010 at 6:00 pm

    like i meant to hibernate in for the mound

  65. maddog1213

    On September 20, 2010 at 6:01 pm

    Like i meant to hibernate in for the mound.

  66. Togot

    On September 21, 2010 at 7:53 pm

    Maddog1213, it could be that, or that it is too stressed from capture to eat. You can try crickets, earth worms, beetles or pill bugs and see if that works better. If you wish to release him next spring that should be fine, though it is likely that it will go into a hibernative state during the winter months. In fact that is another possible explanation for his lack of appetite. I don’t understand what you mean about a mound. If you are referring to using dirt substrate, that should be fine so long as it doesn’t have pesticides. As long as the dogs can’t get the toad it should be, otherwise they will try to eat him and be effected by its toxins. Though a common toad isn’t deadly, it will leave a very nasty taste in your dogs’ mouths. If you want to make the toad hibernate, you have to put him in an unheated room for the winter, and make sure the soil is moist so he can absorb water through his skin.

  67. shawna

    On September 21, 2010 at 9:09 pm

    I have a wild frog and a wild toad and they keep getting really dark, almost black. They eat really good. I have a pool and two small water holes for them, I have grass and dirt for the toad. The frog seems alittle shy still, but the toad comes out as soon as I knock on the window, he knows its time to eat. They like each other too, the little toad sits on the frog and they chill.

    I just don’t know why they keep getting so dark.
    And, I buy 5 days of crickets at a time. Is it okay to put them all in the tank at one time or should I just do it one day at a time?

  68. Togot

    On September 23, 2010 at 3:28 am

    Shawna, their skin is mostly likely getting dark just before they shed it. Placing in a large number of crickets can cause your pet stress since any crickets they don’t eat right away will climb on your pets, and even bite them if they can’t find anything to eat. I usually keep my crickets in a separate tank and drop in two or three a day for each of my pets

  69. madog1213

    On September 26, 2010 at 12:29 pm

    do yuo know about rabbits

  70. madog1213

    On September 26, 2010 at 12:46 pm

    Do you know about rabbits.

  71. Togot

    On September 26, 2010 at 10:38 pm

    Madog1213, though I have never kept them as pets, I do have some knowledge about their care, and my sister keeps them as well

  72. madog1213

    On September 27, 2010 at 8:48 am

    ok well is it ok to keep them outdoors? also if my parents have alergys to cats and im geting a rabbit is that ok?

  73. Togot

    On September 28, 2010 at 3:16 am

    Madog1213, you can keep them outdoors, and many people do, but if you let it run around on the ground it will dig a very deep burrow into the dirt. You should keep it in some kind of cage which is sheltered from the elements. Leaving it exposed to rain and snow can cause illness and death. Most use a wooden boxes that opens from the top. Whatever you use, make sure that nothing can get in and kill it. Cats and dogs will eat a rabbit if they can. It is possible that your parents will react poorly to a rabbit. Most people who are allergic to cats are reacting to the dander and fur which rabbits also shed. You should bring them with you to a pet store, ask to handle an animal, and see how they react.

  74. Molly

    On September 29, 2010 at 2:43 pm

    My son caught a toad and we got repti bark, a log, a little pond thing, and an aquarium with a lid for it. We have had it for about a week and its attracting a ridiculous amount of fruit flies to my house (we keep it in the kitchen) when I open the tank fruit flues storm out of it. I assume from the humidity. What can I do? The subtrate is not to moist at all. Can I keep the aquarium outside? My son really likes it and I don’t want to get rid of it if I don’t have to but I can’t stand the fruit flies! Please help.

  75. molly

    On September 29, 2010 at 2:50 pm

    My son caught a toad. I bought it repti bark,a log, a little pond type thing, and an aquarium with a lid. We have had it for about a week now and it is attracting fruit flies like crazy! I assume it is because of the extra moisture from the water in the pond thingy. Every time i open the lid i get ambushed by fruit flies. the subtrate is not to moist i checked. What do i do about this? Can I keep the aquarium outside or is it getting to cold for that? I do not want to get rid of it bc my son likes it so much but i cant deal with the fruit flies their going every where in my house now. Help please!

  76. Togot

    On September 30, 2010 at 3:46 am

    Molly, Yes, moisture can cause a persistent fruit fly population. There are several little traps you can make for them which I’ve been told work well, though personally I just fed the flies to my ants and praying mantis. Most of these traps consist around the premise of luring the flies into a bottle or other small container which contains a sweet-smelling substance. I recommend using an freshly emptied soda can with a paper funnel tightly fitting in the can’s mouth. The flies will go in, but have difficulty getting out. If there is about an inch of pop left in the can, many of the flies will drown, and those that don’t can simply be trapped inside forever with some tape and thrown away with the can. Just make sure the narrow opening of the funnel is pretty small to make it hard for the flies to find it and escape.

    I don’t recommend putting them outside as it will soon be too cold for them, and if you don’t have the tank set up for hibernation they will die. Try this solution and if it doesn’t work, let me know, and I’ll give you a more complete list of traps to try out

  77. Molly

    On October 3, 2010 at 4:12 pm

    I am trying something i heard about with wine. putting half a glass of wine and covering it with plastic wrap and putting small pin holes in the top. i havent seen any fruit flies coming to it yet but we shall see!!! I’ll let you know if it works : )

  78. Maddie

    On October 27, 2010 at 8:47 pm

    I just caught a frog last night,and named her Booboo.She has a small pool of water. I have questions. 1.Is it ok to use water from a water bottle? 2. my frog won’t use the pool,is that ok? will she die from mot usin it? 3. My frog eon’t move that much is that ok?

  79. Madison

    On October 27, 2010 at 8:47 pm

    I just caught a frog last night,and named her Booboo.She has a small pool of water. I have questions. 1.Is it ok to use water from a water bottle? 2. my frog won\\\’t use the pool,is that ok? will she die from mot usin it? 3. My frog eon\\\’t move that much is that ok?

  80. Togot

    On October 28, 2010 at 3:23 am

    Maddie, anything without chlorine should be alright. She should seek it out when she starts to feel dry. You can use a spray bottle to mist her if you want to be safe. You’re frog might be going into hibernation mode due to the cold weather. You can try to raise the temperature in the room and see if that helps.

  81. Maddie (madison)

    On November 1, 2010 at 8:15 pm

    MY FROG PERISHED!!!! WAT DO I DO??????

  82. Togot

    On November 2, 2010 at 3:34 am

    Maddie, you should either bury it, or throw the body into the trash, depending on your personal sensibilities. Just be sure to wash your hands thoroughly afterwards

  83. Maddie

    On November 4, 2010 at 2:26 pm

    Should I catch another one? How did my froggy die? I saw blood on it’s stmach it was flosatinng in the water. I t was tap water.

  84. Togot

    On November 6, 2010 at 11:38 am

    Maddie, I can’t be sure of the cause, but it was probably the tap water. Tap water contains chlorine which burns out a frog’s liver and kills them. If you want to catch another pet, I encourage you to read the full article above to improve your chances of keeping the next one alive and happy

  85. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 10, 2010 at 12:09 am

    Hi Togot!

    Great articles and advice, but I have a few questions if you have the time?

    We inherited (temporarily) a leopard frog that had previously been kept as a water frog. Its for my nephew who just didn’t know any better. While I think I have done a lot to improve his circumstances, I am curious on a few things?

    I am using a half land/half water tank…unfortunately I didn’t know about using stale or rain water but I did use the Prime drops to condition the water before hand.

    I bought the largest aquarium gravel I could find so he can’t eat it. I have gotten him off the water-frog tetra food in favor of 24 crickets, which he has been happily munching (once he realized he *could* eat them).

    We’re feeding the crickets with slices of oranges and potatoes- to keep them fat and healthy per the pet frog guy at the local store. Is that correct?

    He has an area where he can just hop in or out of the more shallow end of the tank, and hiding areas (boiled terracotta planters) and a fat flat leafed fake plant stretched out across the tank. We are lighting his tank during the day with normal daylight, but at night we are using a 7w Moonlight bulb and it keeps the tank at about 70 degrees at night.

    What I am having trouble with is figuring out how to filter the setup without distrubing him too much but to help remove any impurities from the tank to further improve his tenancy here.

    I’m very new to froggy fostering, and want to learn it correctly, as I intend on teaching it to my nephew afterwards once he can take his froggy back, and yes, the froggy’s name is Kermit. The nephew is 6.

    Please advise?

    Marie

  86. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 10, 2010 at 12:10 am

    Hi Togot!

    Great articles and advice, but I have a few questions if you have the time?

    We inherited (temporarily) a leopard frog that had previously been kept as a water frog. Its for my nephew who just didn’t know any better. While I think I have done a lot to improve his circumstances, I am curious on a few things?

    I am using a half land/half water tank…unfortunately I didn’t know about using stale or rain water but I did use the Prime drops to condition the water before hand.

    I bought the largest aquarium gravel I could find so he can\’t eat it. I have gotten him off the water-frog tetra food in favor of 24 crickets, which he has been happily munching (once he realized he *could* eat them).

    We’re feeding the crickets with slices of oranges and potatoes- to keep them fat and healthy per the pet frog guy at the local store. Is that correct?

    He has an area where he can just hop in or out of the more shallow end of the tank, and hiding areas (boiled terracotta planters) and a fat flat leafed fake plant stretched out across the tank. We are lighting his tank during the day with normal daylight, but at night we are using a 7w Moonlight bulb and it keeps the tank at about 70 degrees at night.

    What I am having trouble with is figuring out how to filter the setup without disturbing him too much. I want to help remove any impurities from the tank to further improve his tenancy here.

    I’m very new to froggy fostering, and want to learn it correctly, as I intend on teaching it to my nephew afterwards once he can take his froggy back, and yes, the froggy’s name is Kermit. The nephew is 6.

    Please advise?

    Marie

  87. Togot

    On November 10, 2010 at 4:50 am

    Marie Nichols-Britt, it sounds like you have a very good setup. What the pet store guy told you about is called gut-loading which is a good thing. It adds to the nutritional value of the crickets when your pet eats them. You may also want to consider using a vitamin spray on them once a week or so. As long as the tablets you are adding to the water remove chlorine, then there shouldn’t be a problem. As for filtration, I use a zoo med turtle 318 filter. It does a decent job of keeping the pollution level in the tank down while only creating ripples on the surface of the water, but you should clean the filter once a week. If you have any further, or more specific questions, feel free to ask, and I will answer to the best of my ability

  88. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 10, 2010 at 1:19 pm

    Dear Togot-

    YoU are AWESOME. Thank you for the advice and the swift reply!

    The Prime is a droplet, so two per gallon is supposed to remove chlorine, and two other kinds of issues from tap water (it escapes me at the moment).

    I treasure the advice, thank you so much!

    Marie

  89. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 11, 2010 at 6:45 pm

    Greetings Togot!

    Ran into an issue- Kermit is fine but the crickets are committing suicide in what I thought was a safe setup.

    Few questions for resolving it, if you have time?

    Is it better to store the crickets separately, in their own container sans the water required for the frog’s needs?

    Should I leave the newly dead crickets on the rocks for him to eat or will he get sick or even eat dead crickets?

    Also…could I put a pothos plant in there to help filter the water? I know its toxic because of the calcium oxylate to cats and dogs, but not sure if this is true for frogs..Definitely don’t wanna poison him.

    My thanks as usual!

    Marie

  90. Togot

    On November 12, 2010 at 4:53 am

    Marie Nichols-Britt, I usually keep mine in a separate tank where they can eat cricket food and drink from a moist cotton ball. I only give my pets two or three a day. Keeping a large number of crickets in the tank with your pet can cause your animal stress as the crickets will crawl on them, and even bite them if they have nothing else to eat. Frogs rarely eat dead insects because their vision is based mostly on movement. My advise would be to throw the dead ones away. As for he plant, I honestly don’t know, but I highly doubt your frog would try to eat the it.

  91. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 17, 2010 at 10:54 pm

    Thank you again!

    We’ve gotten a cricket keeper, complete with proper food and safety for them, and updated to an internal filter for him, and he just loves it..

    He looks way less stressed and even looks, well bigger than when we got him.

    You rock, thanks!

    Marie

  92. Marie Nichols-Britt

    On November 17, 2010 at 10:54 pm

    Thank you again!

    We\’ve gotten a cricket keeper, complete with proper food and safety for them, and updated to an internal filter for him, and he just loves it..

    He looks way less stressed and even looks, well bigger than when we got him.

    You rock, thanks!

    Marie

  93. futurerainbow

    On November 19, 2010 at 9:24 pm

    Hi Togot,

    I am enjoying the knowledge that you have been sharing, but I have not found anything, as of yet; that answers my question, so here it goes..
    My son has captured two green tree frogs in Washington State.
    I am curious as to what makes them want to ‘croak’? Is it talking to the opposite sex or something else?
    I love listening to them talk and I do not want it to change, just curious as to what makes them want to do it.

  94. Togot

    On November 19, 2010 at 10:02 pm

    Future rainbow, frogs make a variety of noises for various reasons, but the most common sounds are the loud mating calls, and a low territorial challenges that males make to each other. For some reason, frogs kept in captivity rarely make their mating calls, but if yours do and you like them, then count yourself lucky

  95. DaFrogMasta

    On March 3, 2011 at 10:10 pm

    Hi Togot, over the spring/summer, i go to the lake to catch frogs. usually 1-2.5 inches in length. over the course of the “season”, i usually catch about 10-15. i was wondering if a 40 gallon breeder {36 by 18 by 16} would be ok.

    Ps: they are north american bullfrogs

  96. Togot

    On March 9, 2011 at 4:43 am

    DaFrogMasta , bullfrogs can grow up to 8 inches. They are big, and aggressive, trying to eat anything smaller than themselves that moves. For this reason, I’ve never kept them as pets. A 40 gallon tank sounds a bit small for that many frogs. It will probably be alright when their young, though I imagine you’ll have to clean the water frequently with that many animals producing waste, and once they start to get bigger, you may have to let a few of them go, or expand their accommodations so things don’t get too crowded. Male frogs tend to get territorial.

  97. DaFrogMasta

    On March 10, 2011 at 6:31 pm

    Thanks for the advice.
    I just got a 20 gallon long tank, 15 pounds of gravel, a hood with daylights, resting rock, medium sized plastic plant, an aqueon filter, and a 10 gallon tank with light fixture hood for $28.00

  98. unclemilton

    On March 10, 2011 at 6:57 pm

    Anyone know where to find a good priced 40 gallon breeder???

  99. DaFrogMasta

    On March 13, 2011 at 11:18 am

    I am looking to get some green frogs and north american bullfrogs. Anyone have any? More interested in juveniels than adults.

  100. DaFrogMasta

    On March 13, 2011 at 11:19 am

    Try to reply ASAP. THANKS

  101. Marie Nichols Britt

    On May 27, 2011 at 9:37 pm

    Dear Togot-

    Thank you again for the awesome advice. The frog is developing quite well and at night has taken to sitting on the terracotta planter under the light, its almost as if he is sunning- is that possible and does that mean that he is cold?

    And I am getting conflicting info on this one, could you settle it for me- how long do leopard frogs live in captivity in good circumstances?

    My thanks as always!

    Marie

  102. Togot

    On May 29, 2011 at 5:20 am

    Marie Nichols Britt, frogs don’t really sun themselves as doing so would dry them out. As you said, he’s doing this at night. Although they don’t mind it warm since they are cold blooded, they tend to go to higher perches to have a better view of their surroundings to spot both food and danger. As for lifespan, it can vary depending on numerous factors, but I’d ballpark it around 5 years.

  103. Marie Nichols Britt

    On June 2, 2011 at 10:18 pm

    Thank you as always Togot! YOU ROCK!

    Marie and her froggie friend.

  104. Lucas K.

    On June 12, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    Dear Togot and any other visitors I have a webste like this but it has information on every animal that is special and not special I will post a new animal every week and if you would like to check it out here http://www.theliveoutdoors.webs.com/ and thats it bye.

  105. edward the toad luvr

    On August 19, 2011 at 9:56 pm

    Dear Togot, its me again. I wuz just wondering if it wuz ok to gut load my crickets with chocolate cereal. Because u said what goes into the cricket goes into the toad. I relly need ur help! Please write as fast as you can on if its okj to gut load my crickets with chocolate cereal, because i dont know if the cereal might poison my toad. Thnx fr the help (btw: srry fr writing so texty and informal compared 2 last time…. that wuz my mom typing ;)

  106. Togot

    On August 22, 2011 at 7:51 pm

    Edward the toad luvr, baby toads like small ants and wingless fruit flies, as well as small wood lice if you can find them. As they grow older, you can feed them larger prey such as beetles and crickets. I try to check this site once a day, but recent events have been keeping me very busy, so I’ve been falling behind on that. As for water, I’ve been getting conflicting information regarding how to remove chlorine and chloromides from water, so I prefer to ere on the side of caution. If you’re going to use tap water, use a dechlorinating additive to make it safe,.

  107. Derp110

    On August 29, 2011 at 7:38 am

    lol I hand feed my frog, salamander, and both my newts worms ,although my frog gets a bit over zealous and tries to eat my fingers, needless to say I think I’m the only one who has been bitten by a frog!

  108. Jessica

    On November 11, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    We have had our frogs all summer and now it\’s winter how do you know they are hibernating or just died cause it\’s under the water but it\’s legs are spread out and it\’s not moving. we also have 3 that are not moving but 1 does that mean those other ones died?

  109. Togot

    On November 16, 2011 at 12:16 pm

    Jessica, when frogs die in water, they tend to float. It is possible that they are starting to shut down and looking for mud to burry themselves in. you can try getting a water heater to wake them up, or give them substrate that they can dig into for the winter.

  110. Mia

    On April 10, 2012 at 11:11 pm

    Ive been doing some research on catching wild frogs, and I’ve seen a website that says that I shouldn’t catch pet frogs because they will be uncomfortable with their surroundings and not eat an might die. I haven’t seen the frogs but I’ve heard them
    Croaking so how do I find out What kind of frog they are? Also is it ok if I use a plastic terrarium? Like the critter totes or what ever they’re called…?

  111. Togot

    On April 18, 2012 at 4:58 am

    Mia, as long as you provide your pets with a suitable environment, they can live long happy lives. A larger critter carrier can work, but a 10 gal aquarium works best for frogs. You can give them deeper water and more room to jump if they want. As for identifying frog calls, perhaps this site can help you.

    http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/topics/frogCalls.html

  112. FaZe Apex

    On May 14, 2012 at 7:17 pm

    hey i gto a frog i named him clyde frog based from southpark lol but he wont eat ive gaven him rolly polies bettles ants worms i havnt tried getting them but my mom s getting them tomorrow and the frog is just a reguler green frog …

  113. FaZe Apex

    On May 14, 2012 at 7:19 pm

    i ment my moms getting crickets tomorrow

  114. Togot

    On May 17, 2012 at 4:20 am

    FaZe Apex, make sure you leave him alone after you give him food. You might be scaring him, and frogs won’t eat if they think moving will get them eaten

  115. D Brown

    On August 3, 2012 at 6:38 pm

    Can frogs survive a Canadian winter in a small outdoor pond. If so, how?

  116. Cathal

    On August 8, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Can I keep more then 1 frog and should I keep a tatpole or a frog

  117. Momma-Hops

    On September 3, 2012 at 8:13 pm

    Hello Togot,
    Thank you for all of these wonderful posts in the name of amphibians! My seven year old brought home a newly formed Leopard frog at the beginning of summer. It is now two inches long and we think it is a girl (ears same size as eyes theory). Her name is “Hops” and she seems happy sitting on a chunk of moss and dodging in and out from a sturdy tree branch stretching across the shallow water and river rocks. We feed her small live crickets daily and are careful to use sun-treated water. She seems happy. But, is she lonely? Should we try to find a male frog or even another female to give her company? If so, at two inches long, what size should the other frog be?
    Thanks for your posts!

  118. Togot

    On September 11, 2012 at 7:31 pm

    D Brown, I’m afraid I honestly don’t know much about Canadian wildlife.

  119. Togot

    On September 11, 2012 at 7:45 pm

    Cathal, frogs can be kept together if they are about the same size. A large frog will eat a smaller one, and tadpoles eventually turn into small frogs.

  120. Togot

    On September 11, 2012 at 7:52 pm

    Momma-Hops, frogs aren’t really social animals and don’t get lonely, in fact males often get territorial and aggressive with each other, but as long as there is room for two, there isn’t any harm keeping them together as long as one isn’t large enough to eat the other. if you introduce a male, he will likely try to mate with her, so unless you are prepared for that, i would recommend another female companion that’s about the same size

  121. Wilbur

    On September 19, 2012 at 8:29 pm

    I don’t understand why my frogs are ontop of each other can you p,z help me

  122. Togot

    On September 20, 2012 at 12:43 am

    Wilbur, it could be that you have a male and a female, and the male has latched on in an attempt to mate. does he have his front legs wrapped around her waist? if so, then this is likely the case

  123. Danielle

    On November 13, 2012 at 8:30 pm

    Hi Togot,
    We have two leopard frogs, one is a little bit smaller than the other, and I believe one is male and one is female (also went with the ear theory). The larger one (male) has been acting strange the last few days. He’d flip onto his back sometimes, whether it’s in the water or on the rocks (we have a water/land setup), then he’ll flip back onto his belly. And today, on occasion, his tongue will be sticking out of his mouth. Is there something seriously wrong with him?

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